National Adoption Week

So it’s national adoption week 2020, and our second time celebrating it as adoptive parents.

Our adoption journey has had many ups and downs, but would I change our experience? Not at all!! I’m writing this blog post led next to the little man watching him sleep after reading his bedtime story. Times are tough at the moment, he returned to school in the beginning of September but due to 3 episodes of having to self isolate he’s only done roughly 2 weeks of school. His routine is all up in the air, and it’s affecting him and me quite a bit. During the adoption process it’s mentioned constantly that routine is vital in creating a secure attachment, it makes the child feel safe, secure and loved but it’s bloody difficult in these times when even I don’t feel fully safe.

I have been honest I when it comes to talking about mine and the mr’s adoption journey. Adopting is such a special thing but it’s not those becoming adoptive parents who are special, or amazing, or honourable (I’ve been called all those things, which are not at all true) it’s the children that are all of those qualities. For me I am honoured to be the dad to such an amazing, kind, caring and special little boy.

It’s a difficult time for many families and for pre and post adoptive families even more so as many of our professional support services are working remotely and being done if possible virtually. But the adoption community is such a strong and supportive community, I am so lucky to have found a number of adoptive parents through Instagram as well as support through social media from charities such as Adoption UK.

Would I recommend adopting? If your thinking of it, then definitely. Would I adopt again? Definitely. Do I have any regrets? Not at all. There are many myths about adoption but these are completely untrue (see my last blog for these myths). In my last blog I listed a load of resources that I have found super helpful during my adoption journey but also that I have used following the placement of my little dude. If you are thinking of adopting check it out, and check out my book and Insta page (you can find the links to these on my word press home page).

LGBTQ+ Parenting

Well, hi guys! Its been a while since my last blog post, I think probably around 6 months and as I’m sure as you all know the world is a crazy ass place at the moment what with the massive spotlight being placed on inequalities in our communities around the world (and rightly so). Despite me being a white male being gay, having an Indian husband, working in a mostly female dominated environment and being a gay dad I have been subjected to many different varieties of prejudice and discrimination, as I’m sure you can imagine or may have even experienced.
The LGBT community faces a lot of different issues compared to other communities for example 52% of the LGBT experience depression, 72% of bisexual women and 56% of bi men have experienced anxiety (Stonewall 2018). Further to this 25% of the global population believe that being LGBT should be a crime (Stonewall 2016), here is a link to these stats https://www.stonewall.org.uk/media/lgbt-facts-and-figures

Very early on in my career being a male in a paediatric nursing environment it is pretty much assumed that you are gay regardless of who that person is, the assumption comes from patients, parents, families and colleagues. Fast forward to the present things are still the same, there is this perception/stereotype that male nurses are gay, it’s just a crazy perception thing, probably tracing back to those standard childhood chats (normally from grandparents – mine definitely were like this) that girls are nurses and boys are doctors.


During the adoption process there was naturally a tonne of support from friends and family, our agency mentioned multiple times during meetings that they were the first London adoption agency that took one prospective adopters from the LGBTQ+ community. It felt that they were using this to sell their adoption agency to us and basically saying that they were the best adoption team out of the other London boroughs.
Following on from this and once we were matched and having to look at schools there was that worry and to be completely honest a paranoia about double and even triple checking that the schools we were considering for our little boy ensured that diversity, inclusion and equality were factors that they exceeded in, so that we knew this would be a safe school for our little guy and for us as two gay dads who would be attending his school for all events. But also to see what they knew about attachment was as this is something that would ensure they could understand what was going on with our little guy.

Its been great to see that over the course of our adoption journey and since we have been a family of 3 how much societies attitudes have changed towards same-sex parenting. naturally there are people who we have come across who have made comments or given us disapproving looks when we have been out, some people have even commented saying that they don’t understand how two dads can parent a child. Luckily early on we found a national group called New Family Social where LGBTQ+ families can meet up with your children, this not only allows your children to play with other kids in the same situation (adopted and who has gay parents), but you get build up your social and supportive network from those who understand what it is like to be in a same-sex relationship and be a parent. Being around those who are in the same/similar situation helps to build your confidence but also brings some normality into your life and this is beneficial to your whole family.
Having those around you who understand what it is your going through makes life so much easier especially, like me, as you can feel very alone and isolated.

There are a few resources available to help teach children about acceptance and diversity when it comes to LGBTQ issues, below is a list of resources that I have used with the little man to help teach him about equality and diversity, and not just in terms of LGBTQ+ rights & equality:

  1. Books by Olly Pike. Olly has written 5 books that focus on LGBTQ+ issues as well as interracial relationships. Check out this link to see his books and other resources, my little man loves his books. https://www.popnolly.com
  2. Pride. This is a great book teaching children about the meaning of pride and why it exists.
  3. Auntie Uncle. Such a great book about a little boy who’s uncle goes out to work in the day but at night he becomes a fabulous drag queen!! Cant wait to get round to reading this to him.
  4. And Tango Makes Three. This is a cute book about two gay penguins that bring up their son. Super cute which my little dude loves.
  5. We are family. This is a sweet little book that talks about 8 different families of different backgrounds, sexualities and abilities.
  6. Stories for boys who dare to be different. This is an amazing book about famous males such as Barack Obama, David Attenborough who struggled to begin with either in their upbringing or in their careers but made it big in the end! A great book to show children that if you struggle at first keep going because you’ll make it.

I think as long as we start to teach our children that people are different and start to get them to accept difference and diversity we can help change peoples perceptions from the beginning. My little dude is a total example of this, we have help create one of the biggest LGBTQ+ allies going, he loves everything to do with pride and rainbows!

Also for those going through the adoption process or know people who are going through the process/thinking of adopting, my first and second book editions are still available on amazon. Check out my previous blog or my website for the link to them.